WrittenAfterwards from cult designer Yoshikazu Yamagata has shot to fame in Japan once again courtesy of its steller Tokyo Fashion Week show “Clothes From Chaos”, but also internationally thanks to Kyary Pamyu Pamyu wearing a piece from the latest collection on the front cover of England’s own iconic Dazed and Confused magazine.  I have actually written about the show already in The Japan Times Newspaper (here if you missed it), but I want to  go into greater detail here as it was to my mind probably the most important individual fashion show at Tokyo Fashion Week, not necessarily for the collection itself, but for what it tells us about how Japanese fashion should present itself.  Indeed, I would go further and say that WrittenAfterwards is not even a fashion brand in the Western sense of the word, it is more of an experience, a means of communication and of education, that echoes the idea coming from the street fashion level that the core of Japanese fashion today isn’t necessarily about clothes and brands anymore, but the context and culture behind it.  If you take for example a shop that has spawned a movement like The Virgin Mary – remove just one cultural element from your understanding of that place, be that the art scene, the styling, trending items, etc and you lose the essence of the fashion, but conversely you can take as many brands as you like away and it is not going to change a thing.  Additionally it is worth noting that Koenji, which is without a doubt the place that exemplifies current Tokyo fashion over Harajuku, has only a literal handful of brand shops.

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

It is a notion that WrittenAfterwards exemplifies, they do not create clothes, they create culture, events and iconic memories that those who are lucky enough to see never forget.  In that way it exerts more influence on Japanese Fashion than a brand who sends a retail-ready smash down the catwalks that has the buyers reaching for their order sheets, even though the churlish will always grumble that it is more art than fashion.

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

We are going to cover WrittenAfterwards’ S/S 2013 in reverse, starting with the mock shrine installation before moving on to the show, as as I have already said, context is everything.  Plus there is no way you are going to be able to focus on anything but the massive showpieces that you can see above which ended the show – each symbolically representing one of the 7 Japanese gods.  Their presence was the crowning glory of the show, accompanied as it was by the fantastically appropriate “Komm, susser Tod” from The End of Evangelion film (available on YouTube if are yet to hear it), but I want to be able to look past them for the purpose of reviewing the show itself, so without further ado lets have an indulgently long look at them now:

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

See if you can work out what each one is supposed to represent, or you can just wallow in the quintessentially Japanese references, both old and new packed into every last one.

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

What we have here is an expression of nihilism concerning the state of Japanese aesthetics today, a sense that things have been crushed together in every possible variation leading to a saturation of culture or cultures without meaning.  On the other hand, as messes go, it isn’t a bad one.

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

Connecting to the dots between the Clothes from Chaos and the Gods above was another installation appropriately named Clothes From Heaven held in the same building.  A mock flea market presided over  by a naked caretaker selling parodies of Dior and Maison Martin Margiela and other excess of luxury culture.

Perhaps this was a reference to flea markets as being a hub of creativity in the 1990s or else the outcome of needing to sell your wares that comes to those who endlessly consume.

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

writtenafterwards unisex tokyo fashion week tokyo style shibuya JFW harajuku fashion brands art

All of the props above were actually featured in the show itself – so stay tuned to see that in our concluding part of the WrittenAfterwards experience.

Tagged with:  
Share →

One Response to WrittenAfterwards – After The Orgy – The Legend Goes On

  1. [...] WrittenAfterwards – After The Orgy – The Legend Goes On WrittenAfterwards – SS 2013 Collection – Bye Buy By Samuel On November 19, 2012 [...]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>